Anthropology 2023, January

The creepiest archaeological finds

The creepiest archaeological finds

Today we will remember the archaeological finds that shook the world. Among them: the mummy Ötzi, the "witch" from Italy and much more

Indigenous Filipinos have retained most of the DNA of the extinct Denisovans

Indigenous Filipinos have retained most of the DNA of the extinct Denisovans

In the genome of representatives of the Philippine tribes, the Aeta found up to five percent of Denisovan DNA - more than any other modern man

It turns out that high testosterone levels do not make men more successful

It turns out that high testosterone levels do not make men more successful

It is believed that high testosterone levels affect men's success. But an international team of scientists has shown that this is not the case

Scientists have suggested that the spread of culture began 400 thousand years ago

Scientists have suggested that the spread of culture began 400 thousand years ago

This is evidenced by the widespread use of fire in the Middle Pleistocene. Researchers from the Netherlands believe that Neanderthals and ancestors of the Sapiens could exchange experiences with each other and with each other already in those distant times

The diet of the inhabitants of the Russian Plain in the Stone Age turned out to be like a wolf

The diet of the inhabitants of the Russian Plain in the Stone Age turned out to be like a wolf

It is believed that our ancestors, who lived in the late Stone Age, hunted mainly mammoths, the meat of which made up most of the diet. The study of the remains of the ancient inhabitants of the eastern part of modern Vladimir showed that this is not entirely true

Only seven percent of the genome was found to be unique to modern humans

Only seven percent of the genome was found to be unique to modern humans

American scientists have found that only seven percent of our genome is characteristic exclusively of Homo sapiens: all other parts of it were the same as in people of other species, as well as more distant ancestors

Hollow Rock weapons indicate a high technical level of Neanderthals

Hollow Rock weapons indicate a high technical level of Neanderthals

Archaeologists have found a clean-shaped leaf-shaped arrowhead that was attached to a complex spear with an effective organic binder

Mountain living linked to high infant mortality

Mountain living linked to high infant mortality

Newborns living at high altitudes are up to 37 percent more likely to die than babies living in low-lying areas. This conclusion was made by scientists from Ecuador

An ancient inhabitant of a cave in the Caucasus turned out to be a carrier of the gene of the modern Western Eurasian population

An ancient inhabitant of a cave in the Caucasus turned out to be a carrier of the gene of the modern Western Eurasian population

An international team of scientists identified DNA from soil in a Georgian cave. Thanks to this, the researchers managed to restore the human genome 25 thousand years old, without any skeletal remains

Scientists have figured out how long a person can live by the end of the century

Scientists have figured out how long a person can live by the end of the century

According to American scientists, the maximum human life expectancy at the end of the XXI century can reach 125-132 years

Found Rare Mutations That Protect Against Weight Gain

Found Rare Mutations That Protect Against Weight Gain

An international study, which involved more than 645 thousand people, revealed a rare variant of the gene: it probably provides protection against excess weight gain

Icelandic experiment to introduce a four-day work week ends in full success

Icelandic experiment to introduce a four-day work week ends in full success

Independent non-profit organizations Autonomy and Alda have published a detailed report on the results of an experiment to introduce a four-day work week in Iceland. More than 1% of the total working-age population of the country took part in it, and the result turned out to be a "stunning success"

Potential Denisovan Skull Candidate Discovered

Potential Denisovan Skull Candidate Discovered

Scientists from China described a skull found in 1933 and suggested that it may belong to a Denisovan man

Works of art found in Neanderthals

Works of art found in Neanderthals

Scientists have found a piece of bone in a Neanderthal cave. The find is more than 50 thousand years old, and it is covered with carvings that have no practical use

Biologists and archaeologists find goat domestication site

Biologists and archaeologists find goat domestication site

Bones and DNA from a Neolithic site in Iran provide the earliest evidence for the domestication of bezoar goats

Sexual dimorphism in our ancestors did not develop as a result of the transition to agriculture

Sexual dimorphism in our ancestors did not develop as a result of the transition to agriculture

Scientists from the United States analyzed the genomes of men and women from the UK and came to the conclusion that sexual dimorphism began to smooth out in our ancestors even before the transition to agriculture

Israeli anthropologists have described a possible new species of hominids - "the man from Nesher Ramla"

Israeli anthropologists have described a possible new species of hominids - "the man from Nesher Ramla"

The remains, dating from the Middle Paleolithic, combine features of Neanderthals and more archaic people: they may have belonged to a hitherto unknown group of ancient Homo who lived in the Middle East

The fashion for pointed shoes provoked massive joint diseases in the Middle Ages

The fashion for pointed shoes provoked massive joint diseases in the Middle Ages

Scientists have shown that the British in the Middle Ages suffered from bursitis for centuries - an inflammation of the mucous bags mainly in the area of ​​the joints

Scientists have figured out how our ancestors lit caves

Scientists have figured out how our ancestors lit caves

Experiments by archaeologists have helped to understand how ancient people used different types of torches and stone lamps on animal fat

Tools of labor, pigs and people: where is the border of reason

Tools of labor, pigs and people: where is the border of reason

Back in the 20th century, it was believed that only people can use tools, and this is an undoubted sign of reason. In fact, they are used by many species - up to insects - and recently it turned out that even pigs can do this

Carbon dioxide surge - the father of human civilization?

Carbon dioxide surge - the father of human civilization?

The new work sheds light on a long-standing mystery: why did man invent agriculture, the basis of his civilization? Initially, there were no pluses in agriculture, but there were many minuses. It is also unclear why the transition was made only ten thousand years ago, although our species has existed for a third of a million years. The answer may be unexpected: it seems that earlier the very emergence of our civilization was impossible due to the different composition of the atmosphere of the ancient Earth. Let's try to figure out what exactly allowed humanity to become

Scientists have compared the intestinal microflora of ancient people with modern

Scientists have compared the intestinal microflora of ancient people with modern

New analysis points to bacteria that are common in pre-industrial societies and those that only appeared in modern humans

Five hundred years of betrayal: what geneticists have told about the weak points of monogamy

Five hundred years of betrayal: what geneticists have told about the weak points of monogamy

Women not have a child from a husband the more often, the lower his social value. Let's try to figure out how biology pushes them to cheat and why monogamy has every chance of revenge

Archaeologists have discovered the oldest human burial in Africa

Archaeologists have discovered the oldest human burial in Africa

Thanks to children's bones, which have rested for more than 78 thousand years in one of the caves of Kenya, scientists have finally managed to learn how the bodies of the dead in Africa were treated

Neanderthals: Spinning to Kill?

Neanderthals: Spinning to Kill?

Archaeologists have found traces of a cord made 39-54 thousand years ago in the Abri-du-Maras cave in the south of France. A cord with a diameter of half a millimeter is woven from three fibers of tree bark, and in such a way that it becomes clear that the Neanderthals are adept at such activities. Why would this species, long considered primitive, need such a complex technology? One of the most likely answers is to craft sophisticated weapons. Alas, it did not help them. After a very short time, humans of the modern species brought to Europe

Bow and arrow: how advanced technology allowed blacks to take over Europe

Bow and arrow: how advanced technology allowed blacks to take over Europe

Dark-skinned Homo sapiens began to displace light-skinned Neanderthals, native Europeans, only when onions were brought to Europe. Is the neanderthal extinction mystery finally coming to a close?

Find the fish in you

Find the fish in you

At first, our ancestors were bacteria. Then - fish. Then - fishes with legs. Then - "lizards". Then - "mice". Then - "proteins". Then it started. How did our ancestors evolve from the ancient fish? We tell

It turned out that our ancestors began to eat roots even before the appearance of Homo sapiens

It turned out that our ancestors began to eat roots even before the appearance of Homo sapiens

Scientists analyzed the tartar of humans, Neanderthals and monkeys. It turned out that our ancestors began to eat starchy foods long before the advent of agriculture and even the very species of Homo sapiens

Neanderthals disappeared from Europe earlier than expected

Neanderthals disappeared from Europe earlier than expected

New radiocarbon dating from scientists from Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and the UK has shown that the last Neanderthals disappeared from Europe thousands of years earlier than previously thought

The ability to digest lactose originated in Europe in just a couple of thousand years

The ability to digest lactose originated in Europe in just a couple of thousand years

By examining the battlefield of the Bronze Age, paleogeneticists have found that the ability of humans to digest milk in adulthood emerged in Central Europe in just under a couple of thousand years - extremely fast compared to most other evolutionary changes in Homo sapiens

The New World was populated twice before - but no one knows who

The New World was populated twice before - but no one knows who

Archaeologists led by Ciprian Ardelean of the Autonomous University of Zacatecas discovered traces of human presence in the Mexican highlands 33 thousand years ago. The new date is twice as old as those adopted earlier, and indicates the possible correctness of Brazilian scientists who found the sites of ancient people of similar antiquity in South America. The discovery means that the settlement of the Americas happened fundamentally differently than it was believed until now - much earlier and, perhaps, not at all by the same

Toothpick marks indicated Neanderthals cared about oral hygiene

Toothpick marks indicated Neanderthals cared about oral hygiene

The Neanderthal tooth retains the grooves left by the toothpick, showing once again that dental health was common even among our long-extinct relatives

Supercomputer Simulation Shows Possible Cause Of Neanderthal Extinction

Supercomputer Simulation Shows Possible Cause Of Neanderthal Extinction

Homo sapiens' cousins ​​survived abrupt climate changes, but could not resist the competition for resources

The modern human brain began to develop less than two million years ago

The modern human brain began to develop less than two million years ago

Anthropologists have discovered that the brain of our anthropoid ancestors began to turn into "human" much later than previously thought: only about 1.7 million years ago

The genetic influence of Australians on the ancient Indians of South America turned out to be stronger than expected

The genetic influence of Australians on the ancient Indians of South America turned out to be stronger than expected

Scientists from Brazil have found that the contribution of Australian Aborigines, Melanesians and the peoples of South Asia to the formation of the community of indigenous people of South America is more significant than it seemed

The oldest site of the first aborigines discovered in the south of Australia

The oldest site of the first aborigines discovered in the south of Australia

Remnants of a native Australian dinner helped clarify when the first humans began to actively spread across the continent

Traces left by people 120 thousand years ago discovered in Saudi Arabia

Traces left by people 120 thousand years ago discovered in Saudi Arabia

Fossilized footprints of several feet off the coast of ancient Lake Alatar in the Arabian desert indicate early migrations of Homo sapiens outside Africa

Primate larynx evolves faster than other mammals

Primate larynx evolves faster than other mammals

A group of scientists from the universities of England Ruskin (Cambridge), Stanford and Vienna found that the larynx of primates is significantly larger in comparison with body size, has large variations and evolves faster than other mammals

Climate "swing" in Africa was considered one of the factors of human evolution

Climate "swing" in Africa was considered one of the factors of human evolution

Scientists have found that the development of our species was facilitated, perhaps, not by a general cold snap and drought on the Black Continent, but by periods of rising and falling temperatures

The evolution of human arms and legs probably happened at the same time

The evolution of human arms and legs probably happened at the same time

The development of the grasping hand in our ancestors, according to an international group of scientists, could go in parallel or immediately after the appearance of bipedal locomotion