Paleontologists have learned what could have influenced the extinction of megalodons

Paleontologists have learned what could have influenced the extinction of megalodons
Paleontologists have learned what could have influenced the extinction of megalodons
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As scientists have found out, giant sharks left their young in shallow water, where it is warm, a lot of food and few predators. As they grew, these fish conquered more and more water, but climate change forced the offspring of megalodons to go through hard times.

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The research is published in The Royal Society journal Biology Letters. The megalodon is considered one of the largest fish of all time, reaching, according to various estimates, 15 meters in length and weighing up to 35 tons and even possibly up to 47 tons. The bite force of these animals, apparently, could be equal to 10, 8 tons, which can be called a record for known living creatures, so they could easily bite into the ribcage of a small whale.

It is not surprising that the megalodons have long been the "kings" of the seas and oceans. It is all the more surprising that they became extinct: it happened about three million years ago. Various theories have been put forward as to why this happened, from climate change to the appearance of toothed whales, the ancestors of modern killer whales, which hunted in packs and had a more developed brain.

Scientists from the British University of Bristol supplemented this data with a new study, which showed that megalodons left their offspring in shallow water, where the water was warmer, a lot of food and few predators. In the process of maturation, the fish went farther and farther into the sea. True, to become a full-fledged adult, the megalodon took a very long time - 25 years.

As the climate became drier and colder, such small and warm areas also became less and less, and young megalodons could begin to die out. Scientists made such conclusions based on the analysis of the teeth of these animals, found in Chile, Peru, the United States and Panama. These teeth, the researchers believe, belonged to juvenile sharks.

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