Mercury in detail: how much do you know about the smallest planet in the solar system?

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Mercury in detail: how much do you know about the smallest planet in the solar system?
Mercury in detail: how much do you know about the smallest planet in the solar system?
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We present to your attention 10 interesting facts about Mercury.

Mercury

We present to your attention 10 interesting facts about Mercury:

Since 2006, Mercury has been the smallest planet in the solar system (formerly this title was held by Pluto, which is now a dwarf planet). Mercury is only slightly larger than the Moon. If the Sun were about the size of a standard front door, then the Earth would be about the size of a 5 cent coin, and Mercury would be about the size of a green pea.

The planet, which bears the name of the ancient Roman god of trade - the swift-footed Mercury - is the closest to the Sun. It is separated from our star by about 58 million km.

One day on Mercury is equal to 59 Earth days (this is exactly how much time the planet needs to rotate around its axis). A year on Mercury is equal to 88 Earth days (the period of revolution around the Sun). It turns out that during its two revolutions around the Sun, the planet makes three revolutions around its own axis.

Mercury belongs to the terrestrial planets. It is similar to the natural satellite of the Earth, not only in size, but also in its physical characteristics. The planet's surface is highly cratered.

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Mercury has a thin, extremely rarefied atmosphere, which is composed primarily of oxygen, sodium, hydrogen, helium, and potassium.

Mercury has no satellites or rings.

Mercury can rightfully be called the least studied planet in the solar system. Only two spacecraft "visited" the first planet from the Sun: the first was Mariner-10, which flew past the planet three times in 1974-1975, and the second was Messenger, which entered the planet's orbit in 2011.

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No signs of life were found on Mercury. According to scientists, the temperature of the planet's surface, which reaches 430 ° C during the day and drops to -180 ° C at night, makes this place completely uninhabitable.

From the surface of Mercury, the Sun looks three times larger than from the Earth.

If the Earth were the size of a baseball, then Mercury would be like a golf ball.

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