New images of active star-forming regions in our galaxy received

New images of active star-forming regions in our galaxy received
New images of active star-forming regions in our galaxy received
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Images of objects NGC 3603 and NGC 2576 with regions of active star formation were photographed by the WFI telescope, owned by the European Southern Observatory.

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Usually, stars are born in cold and "dusty" regions of galaxies, hidden from observation by interstellar dust and gas, and only then, flaring up with light from the first thermonuclear reactions in their bowels, "cleanse" the matter around and allow astronomers to see themselves.

Both of the most prominent astronomical objects captured in the Wide Field Imager telescope (La Silla Observatory, property of ESO, Chile) are bright and large regions of new star birth, located in the Sagittarius arm of our galaxy.

On the left of the image is the star cluster NGC 3603, known for having the most massive stars of any other region in the Milky Way. This object is located 20 thousand light years from Earth.

On the right in the photo is NGC 3576, a much closer object to our planet - "only" 9 thousand light years away, but on the plane of the night sky they are close to NGC 3603. This group of stars is distinguished by its shape - a kind of "ram's horns". Dark areas of dust, which can be seen, for example, near the ends of the "horns", can also become a source of new stars.

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