Archaeologists have discovered an unknown part of the Great Wall of China

Archaeologists have discovered an unknown part of the Great Wall of China
Archaeologists have discovered an unknown part of the Great Wall of China
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In Jingbian County, Yulin City, Shaanxi Province in northwestern China, the ruins of an ancient castle built during the Ming Dynasty were accidentally discovered. As it turned out, it was part of the Great Wall of China.

The site of a temple called Xianying Palace

The Great Wall of China is a vast bastion erected in ancient China and one of the largest construction projects ever completed. In fact, this fortification, the purpose of which is to protect against Mongol raids, consists of many walls. Most are parallel to each other and built in about two millennia in Northern China and Southern Mongolia. The most extensive and well-preserved wall belongs to the era of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) - it is it that has a length of almost nine thousand kilometers.

The wall runs along the ridges of hills and mountains, snaking across the Chinese countryside. About a quarter of its length are exclusively natural barriers such as rivers and ridges, the remaining 70 percent is a wall built by people, and some sections are ditches or ditches. Although long sections of the wall are now in ruins or have been completely lost, it is still one of the greatest structures on Earth.

Although the wall was built many centuries ago, its study has not stopped to this day. A few days ago, the state news agency Xinhua, citing archaeologists, reported that the ruins of Qingpingbao Castle, which was part of the Great Wall of China during the Ming Dynasty, were found in Jingbian County, Yulin City, Shaanxi Province in northwestern China.

So, during excavations, scientists discovered two courtyards. The first was located on the southern side of the castle and was relatively small: 60 meters long and 25 meters wide. Its walls, houses and brick floors are well preserved. They also found 30 clay statues and a stone slab: according to the inscription on the tablet, in this place there was a temple called the Xianying Palace. In the second courtyard lay the ruins of a larger building to the east of the Xianying Palace.

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Qingpingbao is located about ten kilometers from the main part of the Great Wall of China and has retained the patterns and style characteristic of the era of the Ming dynasty, which was associated with a significant period of centuries of Chinese history.

According to media reports, the ruins of the castles were excavated by accident: last year, they began to take out land from this place due to the construction of a road. Alas, Xinhua does not offer any other details of the find - at least not yet.

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