Space food

Space food
Space food
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Here are some fun facts about space food.

Space food

In space, as on Earth, a person needs to eat food to maintain life and work capacity. "Since the beginning of the first flights into space, we have been working on continuous improvement of taste, packaging, as well as the terms and conditions for storing food for our crews," the US space agency said. “Our specialists are doing everything possible to ensure that the orbital station workers eat healthy, easily digestible and tasty food that would contribute to a favorable life and productive work on the ISS.”

Given the difference between life on Earth and in space, scientists are developing food products that will not only be easy to transport into orbit, but also stored and consumed in zero gravity. Moreover, they should be simple “to prepare”. Sometimes, astronauts just need to add water or reheat a ready-made dish to get a hearty meal.

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Despite the fact that in our opinion space food is associated with tubes, they are practically not used anymore. Now the products are stored in a vacuum package, after going through a freeze-drying procedure.

Freeze drying of products allows you to almost completely preserve nutrients in them and significantly increases their shelf life. Moreover, it allows you to significantly reduce the weight of products.

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Here are some fun facts about space food:

A rare astronaut meal is complete without tortilla

Tortilla is a thin tortilla made of corn or wheat flour, which in zero gravity conditions replaces bread for the crew. It is not taken to the ISS in order to avoid many crumbs floating around the station, which then get stuck in filters and equipment.

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Applesauce - the "pioneer"

The first dish Americans have tried in space is applesauce. In 1962, astronaut John Glenn, aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft, squeezed applesauce from a metal tube into his mouth through a hole in his spacesuit. Since then, not only space food has changed a lot, but also its packaging and storage conditions.

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Almost all products poisoned into space are heat treated

This is done in order to kill various microorganisms and enzymes. Only nuts and fruits can escape this fate.

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Liquid salt and pepper on the ISS

If you want to pepper or salt your dish on the ISS, then instead of the usual salt shakers with small granules, you will have to use a jar of liquid spices. This is done so that the spices do not gallop through the station before they get into your dish.

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Food in space may seem bland

Some members of the ISS crew, upon arrival on Earth, noted that food in zero gravity tasted different from usual: it was softer and had a strange taste. NASA believes that one of the reasons for this may be that in zero gravity conditions more blood accumulates in the upper part of the human body, which later affects the sense of smell. To solve this problem, many different sauces, mostly spicy, are delivered to the station.

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"Astronaut Ice Cream" is not for astronauts

One of the most famous space products - astronaut ice cream - can be found in any souvenir shop of any space museum, but it is impossible to find it on the ISS. Astronauts have not tried this delicacy on board the orbital station, but this does not mean that they do not eat ice cream at all. When the next "truck" with food arrives at the station, there is often a refrigerator in which you can find a portion of the most ordinary ice cream.

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Instead of plates - bags and canned food

Most American food is stored in airtight bags, while Russian food is in cans.

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Below are videos showing how to brew a cup of coffee and prepare Thanksgiving dinner aboard the ISS.

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