Russian and Mexican scientists automate 3D printing of aircraft, missile and ship parts

Russian and Mexican scientists automate 3D printing of aircraft, missile and ship parts
Russian and Mexican scientists automate 3D printing of aircraft, missile and ship parts
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Today, 3D printing is increasingly used in the production of large-sized parts for industry. Experts predict that the global market for these technologies will amount to $ 350 billion by 2035. Despite the advantages, there are no technologies today that would accurately calculate the required parameters for printing products. Scientists from the Perm Polytechnic and the Autonomous University of Coahuila (Mexico) are the first to create a methodology that will automate the process of "growing" parts for aircraft, missiles and ships.

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Researchers are implementing the development thanks to a unique project of international research groups (MIGs), which has been operating in the Perm Territory since 2011 and has no analogues in Russia. The support of the Government of the Perm Territory will amount to nine million rubles and will last for three years. On a related topic, scientists have also won a grant from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research. The development became the winner of the all-Russian grant competition of the UMNIK program (2020), the researchers received support in the amount of 500 thousand rubles for two years. The scientists published the preliminary results of the work in the journal of Physics: Conference Series.

“One of the most promising additive technologies is wire surfacing, in which a metal part is formed in layers. But when using this technology, it is difficult to determine the optimal parameters of surfacing in order to avoid defects in production, for example, flashing or even collapse of the walls of the part.

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Nowadays there are no analogues that could calculate a suitable trajectory, wire feed speed and set the power of the source. Our technique will be able to automatically “convert” a 3D model of a part into a control program for a 3D printer,”says Roman Davlyatshin, an engineer at the Center for Additive Technologies Shared Technologies Center of the Perm Polytechnic University.

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Now, to solve these problems, full-scale and numerical experiments are being carried out, but they are not effective enough. Determining the parameters of deposition using numerical simulation will help to more accurately print products and improve their quality. The project was initiated by the group of companies "Hybrid Additive Manufacturing", and other enterprises are also interested in the development. The technique will be promising for implementation in the aerospace and mechanical engineering industries, scientists say. In particular, it can be used in the manufacture of parts for aircraft, helicopters, missiles and ships.

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“Reducing the weight of the aircraft will save fuel and reduce harmful emissions. Our development will help you design parts with less weight, but maintain their functionality. Specialists will be able to process any size of products and expand the "range" of materials ", - explains the researcher.

Now scientists are conducting research and development work.

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They have already created a mathematical model of the process of layer-by-layer "growing" of products. They also experimented with steel and titanium to test the model's performance.According to the developers, a prototype of a software product that will be able to determine the optimal surfacing parameters in real time will be ready in 2023, and the finished product will appear in 2024.

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