Anxiety behavior in men and women was found to be different at the biological level

Anxiety behavior in men and women was found to be different at the biological level
Anxiety behavior in men and women was found to be different at the biological level
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Researchers from the United States studied the anxious behavior of male and female rats, identifying biological factors that influence the development of such patterns. They believe that these findings can be applied to humans as well.

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It is known that anxiety disorders are twice as common in women as in men. Social and cultural factors are likely to play a role in this. However, the biological reasons remain unclear. To find out, scientists from Indiana University and California University School of Medicine (USA) conducted experiments on male and female rodents, the results of which were published in the journal Psychopharmacology.

Studying them, the researchers concluded that they both differed greatly in their reactions to the most important life circumstances associated with anxiety. So, in one of the experiments, scientists set a task for rats - to take food, which was in the center of a brightly lit area.

Rodents don't like bright lights, so this should have provoked anxiety. It turned out that females in such a situation took longer to take food than males. In addition, the former took it in smaller quantities than the latter. Females were more anxious in response to the smell of predator urine, as well as the presence of another rat.

The researchers gave the test subjects medication to reduce anxiety. And it really significantly reduced that in females, but did not have much effect on males. Thus, females have demonstrated that their anxiety increases in response to circumstances of vital importance to them. Scientists believe these findings can be applied to humans as well.

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