Unripe "apples", or the Worst gadgets in Apple history

Table of contents:

Unripe "apples", or the Worst gadgets in Apple history
Unripe "apples", or the Worst gadgets in Apple history
Anonim

Apple's path to the top of the tech market was thorny and littered with mistakes, some of which could be called failures. However, the company knows how to learn from them positive lessons to avoid repeating this in the future. Apple's unsuccessful creations have become a part of its history along with the iPhone.

Apple

Apple lisa

Personal computer "Lisa" (Apple Lisa), which was released in 1983, was named after the daughter of Steve Jobs. PC sales were not going very well due to two big drawbacks: "Lisa" was slow and inconvenient to use (Motorola 68K processor with a clock frequency of 5 MHz and up to 2 MB of RAM), in addition, the starting price of the gadget was $ 10 thousand … The fate of "Liza" was decided by the inexpensive Macintosh that appeared soon, equipped with a processor with a frequency of 7, 89 MHz. Unsold PCs, according to legend, were buried in the ground at a landfill in Utah for the purpose of tax write-off.

Image

Apple bandai pippin

In 1996, Apple teamed up with Japanese game developers Bandai to create the Apple Bandai Pippin game console. In fact, it was a multimedia computer running on a stripped-down version of the Mac OS base and connected to a TV through a video input. The console lasted only a year on the market. 42 thousand units were sold. By comparison, Sony sold 250,000 PlayStation 4s within the first 48 hours of the console's launch. The Apple Bandai Pippin's problems were its high price (around $ 600), poor performance and, most importantly, a short list of games. You can play them now. The fact is that Apple Pippin support is implemented in Mac OS Classic, and games can be run on a modern PC through the Macintosh emulator.

Image

Personal Digital Assistants

Personal Digital Assistants Apple Newton MessagePad, in fact, became the prototype of the modern tablet. It hit the market in 1993 and was equipped with a stylus for composing letters and the ability to send faxes. The gadget was summed up by a "curve" handwriting recognition program and power supply, which was carried out from three AAA batteries, that is, the "factory" of the device was short-lived. Jobs buried the PDA in 1997. The Apple Newton MessagePad can still be found on the market today. For example, on the Internet auction eBay, the owners ask for such a "vintage" about $ 200.

Image

Apple USB Mouse

The first Apple computer mouse to be connected via USB was the Apple USB Mouse with a single button on top. It was released in 1998 and was included with the iMac G3 PC (discontinued 2003). A rather nice design with translucent plastic was spoiled by two nuances. First, the device rotated during use, which was extremely inconvenient. Secondly, it had a very short cord. The mouse lasted only two years, earning the title of "Apple's biggest mistake" before its "death".

Image

Apple QuickTake

Apple was also noted in the field of photographic equipment. Launched in 1994, the three Apple QuickTake digital cameras were co-developed by Kodak and Fujifilm. The models were given the names "Venus", "Mars" and "Neptune". They took pictures with a resolution of 640x480 pixels and had some difficulties in compatibility with other equipment. For example, the camera created by Fujifilm was only compatible with the Macintosh. The gadget was warmly received by customers and was awarded the title of "first consumer digital camera" by Time Magazine. In fact, this was not the case, since the Logitech FotoMan had previously become such a camera. However, the consumers themselves did not care: they chose Canon, Kodak and Nikon.

Image

Apple Power Mac G4 Cube

The Apple Power Mac G4 Cube, released in 2000, had every chance of success. Not only was it quite powerful (a PowerPC G4 processor with a clock frequency of 450 MHz and up to 1.5 GB of RAM), buyers were also attracted by the futuristic design of the system unit (and in a plexiglass case).The design was done by Jonathan Ive, the author of the recognizable appearance of the fifth generation iPod and, according to Steve Jobs, "a spiritual partner of Apple." The bright future of the gadget was overshadowed by its unique ability to overheat. There was no fan in the unit. In the end, the Apple Power Mac G4 Cube only stayed on the market for a year.

Image

Macintosh TV

Long before the Apple TV appeared, the company created its predecessor, the Macintosh TV. It was a hybrid of a computer and a TV, encased in a 14-inch CRT monitor, manufactured by Sony. The user, switching, could choose between a computer and cable TV. After entering the market in 1993, Macintosh TV only sold for five months. 10 thousand copies of this miracle device were made. An interesting nuance: the function of screenshots was implemented in Macintosh TV. The user could take a screenshot from the TV show and then save it to the computer. Also, the device was equipped with a remote control.

Image

Popular by topic