The hottest places on Earth

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The hottest places on Earth
The hottest places on Earth
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Dallol, Tirat-Tzvi, Kebili, Timbuku, El-Aziziya, Death Valley are the hottest places on Earth.

Dallol

Dallol, Ethiopia

The Dallol settlement is located in Ethiopia's Afar Basin and holds the first place for the highest average annual temperature ever recorded. From 1960 to 1966, the average temperature in this area was 34.4 ° C. That is, the heat in this region, although not the most terrifying on the planet, does not subside almost all year round. At the same time, the heat literally comes not only from above - from the Sun, but also from below - from the Earth, since the Afar Basin is a volcanically active region located near the Dallol volcano.

Fortunately, today this truly hellish place is considered a ghost town (there was a mining settlement here in the 1960s). In addition, this is one of the most remote places on the planet, there are no roads, and communication with Dallol exists through caravan routes directed to collect and deliver salt.

Tirat Zvi, Israel

Tirat Tzvi is a religious kibbutz in Israel located in the Beit She'an Valley. On June 21, 1942, the highest temperature ever recorded in Asia was recorded here - 53.9 ° C. Despite the fact that the Jordan River maintains the fertility of this region, in summer the sun's rays literally scorch the valley.

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Kebili, Tunisia

Oddly enough, Kebili is a desert oasis in Tunisia, where the local population now and then flees from the heat. That's right, because there are palm trees and life-giving water. Despite this, the mercury column in the oasis now and then rises to 55 ° C.

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Timbuku, Mali

Despite its rich history, the city of Timbuku is gradually receding in front of the looming Sahara Desert. In the city itself, new sand dunes appear every now and then, and the streets are often buried under the wind-blown sand. An accompanying problem of the city is the unbearable heat, which rises here above 55 ° C.

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Rub al-Khali, Arabian Peninsula

The Rub Al Khali Desert covers the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It is located in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Yemen and the UAE. It is the largest continuous sandy desert in the world and one of the hottest. The temperature rises to 56 ° C, and the average annual rainfall barely reaches 3 cm.

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El Aziziya, Libya

On September 13, 1922, the world's highest shade temperature was recorded in the Libyan city of Al-Aziziyah, reaching 57.7 ° C. However, this does not mean that El-Aziziya is the hottest place on the planet. So, the average annual temperature here is lower than in the above-mentioned Dallola. In addition, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) does not recognize the temperature record of Al-Azizia, citing unreliable means of fixing the temperature. But WMO recognizes a record of 56.7 ° C, registered on July 13, 1913 in Death Valley.

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Death Valley, USA

It is the lowest, driest and hottest region in North America. Despite the scary name, life exists here - from shrubs to small rodents. Death Valley is also famous for its mysterious moving stones.

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Deshte Lut, Iran

Despite the fact that the official record for the maximum air temperature so far belongs to the Death Valley, the maximum temperature of the earth's surface was recorded in 2005 in the Deshte-Lut salt desert in southwestern Iran - 70.7 ° C. Here is one of the highest dunes in the world - 407 m.

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