Physicists have developed the whitest paint in the world

Physicists have developed the whitest paint in the world
Physicists have developed the whitest paint in the world
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The new barium sulphate dye reflects visible and infrared waves, keeping temperatures below ambient.

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Scientists from the American Purdue University have created the "whitest paint", which reflects not only 98 visible radiation, but also in the infrared part of the spectrum. Until now, the best samples of such dyes did not reflect so well - up to a maximum of 95 percent. However, the main goal of the work was not at all the ideal white color, but the future energy savings by reducing the cost of air conditioning. This is reported in an article published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Professor Xiulin Ruan and his team took barium sulfate as the basis for their development. It is not used as widely as titanium dioxide as a white pigment, but it does not absorb ultraviolet light and does not cause unnecessary heating. The sulphate was used in high concentration (60 percent) and with different particle sizes, which allows them to scatter waves of different wavelengths.

In field experiments, new paint-coated objects maintained temperatures 4.5 degrees below ambient, even in bright direct sunlight. According to scientists, infrared waves reflected by this material have an ideal length: they are poorly absorbed by the atmosphere and can freely "flow" into space without causing additional heating of the entire planet. The authors of the novelty have already applied for patent registration and hope to bring it on sale within a couple of years.

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